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20130102
20130102
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
with matt cohen, from off the grid. >> we assembled trucks and put them into a really unique heurban settings. >> what inspired you to start off the grid? >> i was helping people lodge mobile food trucks. the work asking for what can we get -- part together? we started our first location and then from there we expanded locations. >> why do think food trucks have grown? >> i have gotten popular because the high cost of starting a brick and mortar or strong, the rise of social media, trucks can be easily located, and food trucks to offer a unique outdoor experience that is not easily replaced by any of their setting any worlwhere else in san franc. san francisco eaters are interested in cuisine. there adventuress. the fact theyuse grea use great ingredients and make gourmet food makes unpopular. >> i have been dying to have these. >> i have had that roach coach experience. it is great they're making food they can trust. >> have you decided? >> we are in the thick of the competition? >> my game was thrown off because they pulled out of my first appetizer choice. >> how we going to crush
. >> the hospital says the health and safety of the patients is the top priority. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> this nurse she treats some of the sickest patients and if they get the flu there could be some serious health consequences. >> right, if you or i get the flu it's unpleasant, we're out of work for a couple of days or maybe a week, we don't feel well but we're probably not going to die but when someone is that sick in the hospital or in a hospice, if they get the flu, they could die and in fact 36,000 people a year die from the flu, so it's a serious thing for these patients. >> so this hospital has this mandatory policy. is this becoming more common? >> it is becoming more common because the only protection really for these very sick patients, of course they get the flu shot themselves, but it's so surround them with people who have also been vaccinated, so before around 2005 hospitals didn't really care so much, they didn't really push this, but then they started to push it and look at these numbers. it really tells you s
. pros and cons of being slightly overweight. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spells them out next. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> this story is for me and probably everybody watching. if you packed on a couple of extra pounds over the holidays, excuse me, you might not have to worry so much about it. according to a new study, being a little overweight might help you live longer. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. i'm going to live to be 150 then. >> oh, please. you're one of the most fit people i know. >> it sounds counterintuitive. help us understand this. we can ditch our diet. >> we have been preached at all thes
we have this area first up. supervisors com poems and cohen joined the meeting. we got a lot of feedback. most of it constructive. and we'll be working over the next few months. we'll have follow-up meetings, late winter, early spring and hopefully have a proposal for you probably some time in the spring we hope will receiptv a consensus from the community -- front community to manage needs in that area. hopefully good progress in that front. >>> in the spirit of free muni, a small gesture of -- well, two things. first, as we do every year on new year's eve, we'll be providing free muni service from 8:00 p.m. till 6:00 a.m. to make sure that everybody can get around safely and unimpaired. at least those operating vehicles will be unimpaired and we'll help everybody else get to where they need to go. there is a fire works show at the embarcadaro and mission at midnight. and we want people to be able to travel safely. we're working with the police department and other departments to make sure everybody is safe. and along the lines of free, you'll have on your agenda today, i th
this conversation with supervisor cohen yesterday -- is that the unfortunate thing is that what we have seen is an effort to pit, you know, doing something to provide access to low-income youth against the very important goal of actually funding maintenance for the mta. the two are not mutually exclusive and, in fact, the program that's before you, the funding that's before you recognizes that to increase access to transportation, you have to do both. and as director rifkin said, this funding proposal allows you to not only fund this pilot program, which is why -- one of the reasons that the mtc gave you this funding, but also allows you to meet the maintenance need that all of us should be addressed. you know, you don't have to choose between helping low-income youth and actually making the system work. i do believe that that is a false choice, and i think that we can walk and chiu gum at the same time. i think that it is in the interest of these youth that we have a system that works. but a system that works will not be meeting the needs of low-income families if families cannot afford to
'll be surprised, i have to do this publicly, supervisor malia cohen came by and helped the process along. anybody knows her, she jumped into things, it was a rainy day, i have to thank the public, they were very, very patient, amazingly patient standing outside in those lines and then coming in inside the rain, they stood there until we got every firearm processed. this was one of those unique things where it was, you know, the factors you like to see involved. a private donor who put up the first part of the money, a community organization and law enforcement. and the next part of it happened on both sides of the bay. i mean i know captain joiner in oakland said it was the first time he had ever seen this kind of collaborative effort between -- for this particular purpose. the fact that it was going on, on both sides of the bay at the same time and both of us accomplishing way more than we hoped to do was just an amazing thing. and then, chief, i got to thank you for those. at some point the grant money that we had ran out and i was going to go out and tell everybody to go home. but you sa
't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned me up the next day. can we cut $40 million out of this project? it was one person more responsible than any others, it's tony irons, was the architect that was responsible for the revitalization of city hall who came to my office and said, we cannot abandon this. we can't walk away from this project. we have an opportunity to really take a lot of our values and principles, particularly raising the bar as we did as a city on our green building standards, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when
, our first panelist is dr. becky cohen vargas who is director of not in our schools san francisco. >> i am actually director of not in our schools which is part of not in our town. here in the bay area we have one because sometimes we think these things don't happen here, but they do. transgender student killed, gwen arejo, we have a short film. we are a move president and we are about youth taking a move to stop bullying but also intolerance with the statement not in our school, not in our town. . >> based on the idea that students can lead the way in creating a better school. >> people can do something right and you all have a chance to make a difference in a person's life. >> we're excited about the not in our school web site because it's a wonderful way for teachers and students to come together on issues of empowerment so they can learn from each other. >> if you say the word, that is so gay, is it necessary that you say something about it. >> it is a peer to peer story-sharing site. >> whenever you are able to take where someone is coming from and gives you a place to find commo
. for the record redoing third event is coming near. >> and also eliot cohen is in raise the intellectual godfather of this book. his book says syrian command. his book supreme command is the best single thing ever written on how president should talk to the military. >> fantastic. autonomy said that. >> inÉs said. [laughter] >> my question coming out of the strategicprogram is two pronged mlb on this i have your book yet, so i hope you have a nerdy answer this. but the very well-publicized job done in afghanistan appeared to asia, what gives you hope when it comes to future generalship and what makes you despair? >> second part is easier to answer. a lot of things make me despair. what gives me hope that it's going to some perverse, but it's not. the defense budget is going to be cut and let us cut as the british famously said we have no money anymore, so now we must need. we have a military that is at a fire hose of money turned on the last 10 years and intelligence community community as well. they were basically given money and told her to spend it through the we have a generation of officers
issues. >> woodruff: but tennessee democrat steve cohen warned about the consequences of not taking the senate deal. >> my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't get together and do something. >> woodruff: later house democratic leaders emerged from a nearly three-hour meeting with vice president biden, who helped broker the senate deal. minority leader nancy pelosi called for action. >> we look forward now as we go forward in this day to see what the timing will be for a straight up-or-down vote on what passed 89-8 last night in the united states senate. >> woodruff: house republicans also met and gave no sign they were ready to call a vote on the senate bill. instead majority leader eric cantor said he won't support the measure. and others left open the possibility of changing the bill. and sending it back to the senate. >> woodruff: the story at this hour still unfolding at the house but all signs are pointing to a vote on the senate compromise later tonight. we get an update now froms in regular todd zwillich. h
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
. cohen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you. i appreciate the moment. i just -- this has been a very interesting couple of days. ones that i would normally have spent with friends in memphis drinking champagne and looking forward to the new year. it's been an honor serving with you, mr. dreier. you are an outstanding member, as ms. slaughter said, and there are lots of other people on the aisle who are fine republicans who i'm friendses with and think the world of -- friends with and think the world of. but i'm happy this day ended the way it did. and somehow, we're going to end up not falling off the fiscal cliff and i think that's wonderful. so i thank ms. slaughter for the time and i thank speaker boehner for whatever he's done to produce this -- what i suspect will be a positive result for the american people. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i'll continue to reserve the balance
life. our senior medical correspondent, elizabeth cohen, is joining us with these surprising results. elizabeth, this is so counterintuitive. help us understand what is going on here. >> right, wolf. well, we're told lose weight to be healthier, but what this study of more than 3 million people found was when they were overweight, they actually seemed to live a bit, not a lot, but seemed to live a bit longer. it may be because weight is not quite as important as we think. there may be other things that are also important. so the lesson here may be, know your weight, but in addition, know what your blood pressure is. know what your cholesterol level is. know what your glucose is. and also, keep your weight, if you can, in the right places. distribution matters. it's worse around the belly. so it may be that these overweight people, that many of them all these numbers and all that distribution was just fine, they were just kind of overweight. >> what is -- what do they consider being overweight? >> right. let's take a look at these numbers. and this comes from something called the body
husband. in 1996 i recall senator bill cohen approaching me, along with senator mccain, to help sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate, and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt, senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important ban that remains in place today. an effort to bring about further reform. and i must say burma is extremely lucky to have a champion like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, intimidation, harassment, she has never wavered from her principles or ceased her push for democracy and human rights. she celebrates the release of political prisoners, including approximately 90 released this week. but she remains true to those who remain behind bars, a number estimated to be around 200. this woman sacrificed many years of her life to bring about these changes. she is truly an inspiration to the world. you are so well deserving of this congressional gol
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)